Meshaper Afiyah

I had asked my parents to please bring me back some Meshaper Afiyah (literally meaning beautified baking??). I had read on some forums that this Israeli dough conditioner improves challah dough. Dvora uses it. So, anyway, after much searching, they found this container in a health food store.

But, what does the container say? Ingredients? Instructions?

I think the instructions for using it for bread are as follows: Mix 5 heaping teaspoons with a half cup of water for every kilo of flour.

Is this even regular dough conditioner or some kind of fiber additive?

Does anyone know??

Update: thanks to Risa (Isramom), I now know what this is: Fibrex sugar beet fiber, which is used as a health supplement and to improve moisture and general freshness retention in baked goods. It is useful in gluten free baking, as well. This is very cool.

10 Responses to “Meshaper Afiyah”

  1. Lauren Says:

    I’m definitely the wrong person to ask! I want to know now, though. I love a good mystery!

  2. Risa Tzohar Says:

    Here goes:
    Fibrex fibers absorb 3 to 4 times their weight in cooking and 7 times their weight in baking.
    For baking: To enrich breads and other baked goods, mix 5 teaspoons of fiber with 1/2 a cup of water, at room temperature, for each kilogram of flour in the recipe. Wait 15 minutes until the fiber absorbs the water then add the mixture to the recipe.
    For cooking: Add 2-2 teaspoons of Fibrex to a kilogram of chopped meat for patties, to gravy, to pasta and soup.
    For granola, breakfast cereal and milk products: Recommended to enrich with 1/2 a teaspoon of fiber. After the meal it is recommended to drink a glass of liquid.

    • pragmaticattic Says:

      Thank you so much, Risa!! One more question, though: what is this product? Can you please tell me what the ingredients are? I just can translate that there is no added sugar.

  3. Isramom Says:

    The second photo says in the top dark green patch:
    Without wheat, barley, rye, oatmeal and soy. Low protein, with no sugar added, with no chemicals added.
    The next dark green patch says:
    nutritional composition for 100 grams
    dietary fibers 73 grams
    energy 62.5 calories
    carbohydrates 5.5 grams
    protein 9 grams
    fat 0.5 gram
    calcium 1100 mg
    sodium 50 mg
    iron 25 mg
    Net weight 330 grams
    Kosher-parve

  4. Risa Tzohar Says:

    On the front (under the bread) it says “Nutritional Fiber 100% natural from sugar beets” and underneath that it says: 1/3 soluble fiber, 2/3 insoluble fiber

    • pragmaticattic Says:

      Oh, so it is kind of like Metamucil! Thanks, Risa!! I guess it isn’t really a dough conditioner, it is just a fiber supplement. I used it in challah and I couldn’t tell I had added anything. But, if it adds lots of fiber without changing the taste of the bread, I guess that is an improvement. Thanks so much for coming to my rescue . . . .

  5. Dvora Says:

    The meshaper afiyah (literally baking improver) that I use is a little different. It comes attached to the fresh granulated yeast packet, and both are measured for use with one kilo of flour. (They also sell it in a baking goods store in larger quantities) The first ingredient is sugar, along with cornstarch, soy flour, enzymes, Vitamin C, and some other things I can’t translate – and maybe then I shouldn’t use what I can’t ID! I can’t say to a certainty that it works, so these days, I buy whichever yeast is fresher, with or without the added meshaper packet.

  6. Naomi Ross’s Mom’s Sweet and Sour Meatballs (plus a vegetarian variation) « Pragmatic Attic Says:

    […] used some meshaper afiya in the meatballs–I think that it helps the meatballs stay moist, but I’m sure if it […]

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